Invasive Non-Native Species

As part of our Nature Restoration Fund award, RESP is developing a catchment management strategy for key INNS plant species following the methodology of the highly successful Scottish Invasive Species Initiative.

Non-native species are animals or plants that have been introduced into an area where they do not naturally occur. They become invasive when they are established and take over the habitats of other species and/or disrupt the ecosystem. They are often known as ‘INNS’.

image of balsam

Objectives

What is RESP going to do?

For now, we are concentrating on plants. We are mapping the distribution of the plants throughout the catchments of the River Eden and Motray Water and their tributaries from source to sea. This will enable us to plan a catchment-wide strategy for control.

Invasive Species in the Eden Catchment

The River Eden has several plant and animal INNS including:

  • Giant Hogweed
  • Himalayan Balsam
  • Japanese knotweed
  • Skunk Cabbage
  • Few-flowered leek
  • North American Signal Crayfish
  • Pink Salmon
  • Mink

Scotland’s Environment website has more information on some of these species, especially ones where they want people to support management and eradication.

Funders

nature restoration fund logos

Get involved with INNS control on the Eden

We want local people to join in with this project to control INNS. This year we have funding for the full herbicide training for ten people, if you would like to help us, please get in contact. All equipment and training is free. We will also hold INNS identification workshops over the summer.

We want local people to join in with this project to control INNS. This year we have funding for the full herbicide training for ten people, if you would like to help us, please get in contact. All equipment and training is free. We will also hold INNS identification workshops over the summer.

Himalayan Balsam Bashing events are held in Cupar. To take part contact [email protected]